Archive for the ‘ Tri Apparel ’ Category

Open Water Swimming Tips for Triathlon

The shortest leg of the race in triathlon is often funny enough, the most feared. By far, you’re certainly the least out-of-control of your surrounding environment in this leg, which can allow for the capability to put a nice damper on your time. Most triathlons take place in some kind of a body of open water, so assuming your pool skills will transfer right over isn’t the case, and often times, can be dangerous. There’s many tips that can be followed to keep yourself safe, and drop seconds to minutes on your swim. We spend tons of money on gadgets, wheels, aero-dynamic and light-weight everything to save seconds and minutes, so why not take the time to practice open-water techniques for the swim?

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What to Wear Under a Triathlon Wetsuit

The question of, “What am I supposed to be wearing underneath my tri wetsuit?” is undoubtedly the most asked in the shop. The idea of wearing clothing underneath neoprene,  seems odd to many first-time triathletes. In reality, you can’t tell a difference underneath your wetsuit, and will save quite a bit of time by swimming in what you will be racing in. Essentially you wear whatever it is you’ll be competing in underneath. Often times, it’s the same clothing that you’ve been training ever so hard in over the course of the past months/weeks. With that said, triathletes have a couple of options as to what they choose to wear underneath their tri wetsuit.

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Zoot Endurance Tri Tank

Here we have the feminine Endurance Tri Tank by Zoot. It is a tri -specific top which is perfect for racing as well as training. It is composed of a nylon/spandex fabric featuring Endura technology. This technology is custom to specific Zoot items, allowing for optimum compression and muscle support, as well as reduces muscle fatigue and extends endurance. The stretch in the fabric allows for superior range of motion. The top also features a built-in bra, as well as a 10″ zipper.  Zippers can be great on race apparel because it allows for venting should you get over-heated, and opens the top to feel less restricting. There are two pockets that are placed on the sides to avoid catching any water are perfect to hold your nutrition goodies. The top comes in a array of colors: Virtual Pink/Fuel, Tropic/Green Lantern, Indigo/Ice, Black. The collar around the neckline gives the top an added touch of style. Pair with the Zoot Endurance Tri Short to complete the look. Both on sale now at One Tri.

De Soto Carrera Tri Short Low Rise

Comfort and looks. Quite frankly the two things I myself as well as most women are concerned with in apparel. I myself have worn these shorts through countless races and training rides and recommend firstly to those looking for a durable tri short. Why the Carrea Low Rise? Here are some specs:

  • Carrera™ Skin– a nylon/spandex blend that is lightweight, breathable, quick-drying and keeps its support and fit, even when wet. (I could barely even tell my shorts were damp after the swim).
  • Low-rise – Not going to dig into your hips.
  • One-piece seamless tri pad- No surprise seam that you’re going to find.
  • Contrast Microlock Stitching
  • Drawstring Elastic Waist with Wide Band –This is a great feature that keeps a possible muffin top at bay.

All around fantastic short. Below is a shot of me in a recent race sporting the De Soto Carrera Low Rise’s and bringing home the medal. Coincidence?

TYR Competitor Tri Singlet and Tri Short

TYR has debuted a new line this year called the Competitor Line. The line of tri shorts as well as triathlon singlets were designed particularly for comfort, sot that athletes could  reap the benefits of their hours spent on the road training. What’s so great and different about this line? Let me explain….

Beginning with the TYR singlet, I’d like to note the fact that it’s white. No other company makes a top for women  in this color. Why white? I get asked by countless people in the shop for white tops in general. After 4, 5, 6, hours on the road you’ll understand why a black top (in pretty hot weather mind you) will feel most certainly warmer. Beyond the fact that it’s white, it still offers 50 SPF and UV Protection. It conveniently has a zipper pocket on the back to store your necessary nutrition (my favorite part about the top, other than it being white). A front zip can be found on the front of the top, which is again perfect for adjustability in warmer weather.

On to the short..I realize that I have raved about the De Soto Carrera in a previous post. The only thing that short is missing is  a decent tri pad. The Competitor Tri Short features the newly designed and advanced TYR Tri-Pad for which denotes to help with even weight distribution and chafing, as well as  irritation prevention. It’s hard to find a decent tri pad that’s perfectly in the middle of not too bulky like a diaper, but still offers some padding. Fleece liners don’t quite cut it after miles 30 or 40. Another note-worth addition of this short is the gripper. It is lined with a silicone beading, which keeps the short from sliding up and down, while leaving you WITHOUT irritation and sausage legs! A zipper pocket is also featured on the back of the short to store even more of your goodies.

Triathlon Short vs Bike Short

“What’s the difference between a tri short and a bike short?” Working for a triathlon company, I get asked this question more often than not. Three distinct items differentiate a tri and bike short: function, make-up (how the short is designed), and price.

Function: Whether or not you’re really going to need that diaper of a pad….

Bike shorts often come with the notion of having a “diaper-like” pad. This is based upon the fact that the padding (chamois) in a bike short is much thicker as well as covers a wider surface area of the short (the pad reaches higher in the front, as well as the back for more cushion support). So why would you need a thicker pad as a triathlete? Simple. If you plan on logging in some serious miles (let’s say beyond 20 or 30 mile rides) a thicker pad will eventually become a necessity. However, a biking short is just that: made for biking. A short with such a cushion would not be functional to bike and swim in.  Thus, is designed for longer training rides.

Make-up: Different design features of a tri and bike short

As previously mentioned, there’s the distinct difference of a thinner chamois in a cycling short but what else separates the two? A tri short tends to be shorter in length (a good 2-3 inches depending). Tri shorts generally range around 6” to 10”. A tri short is also designed to wick moisture, meaning they’re going to keep much drier and won’t absorb nearly as much water as a bike short. The actual shape of the chamois is designed with running in mind. Its shape moves with you while running, and doesn’t span quite as wide. The cushioning is slight, and light enough to become unnoticeable while out on the run.

Pricing: Cost differences

On average, you’re going to be looking at a slightly steeper cost for a cycling short. More material and a thicker padding usually translates to a little bit more of a cost. So when should you spend the extra cash? When a thicker chamois and longer short can’t be compromised. For the most part, you’re probably going to want to stick to tri shorts for race day, but on longer training days, it’s not worth the saddle pains.

If you’re looking for a best seller as far as cycling short for comfort reasons, check out the De Soto 400 Mile Bike Short.

Need an all around great tri short? Check out the 2XU Comp Tri Short. Get both shorts at OneTri.com

Happy Training.